Brimnes RE 27

Built: Norway 2003
Brt. 2880 Length 70,10 Width 14,60
Captains: Pall Runarsson
Tel bridge: 851 2290
Tel crew/engine: 851 2291/ 92

Gudmundur í Nesi RE 13

Built: Norway 2000
Brt. 2464 Length 66.0 Width 14.0 Depth 8.67
Captains: Kristjan Gudmunsson / Thorgrimur Joel Thordarson
Telephone: 843 4251/843 4250

Kleifaberg RE 70

Built: Poland 1974
Brt. 893.3 Length 69.57 Width 11.3 Depth 7.3
Captains: Vidir Jonsson / Árni Gunnólfsson
Tel: 852-1041 /851-2250

Vigri RE 71

Vigri RE 71

Built: Norway 1992

Gross 2157 Length 59,4 Width 13 Depth 8,5

Captains: Sigurbjörn Kristjánsson / Eyþór A Scott

TEL: 517 0311

Our main species

Sebastes marinus (norvegicus)

gullkarfi

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The golden redfish is one of the most common and commercially important fish in Icelandic waters. It is commonly from 35 to 40 cm long in catches, but exceptionally large individuals of up to 100 cm and 15 kg have been measured.

 

 

 

These huge individuals are often called centennial redfishes as they are probably very old. It is however possible that these very large redfishes belong to a different stock, or even species, than the common golden redfish.

 

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Sebastes mentella

djupkarfi

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The deepsea redfish is in many regards similar to the golden redfish. It just lives deeper. The fishing areas around Iceland and global distribution are very comparable (except for the depth of course). Size in catches is similar, but the deepsea redfish matures larger, or at the size of 37 to 42 cm long. It is very difficult to age determine the deepsea redfish.

 

Spawning time is similar as with golden redfish but the deepsea redfish has more larvae, or from 40,000 to 400,000. The main food is also zooplankton, mostly krill. It is benthopelagic as the golden redfish but differs as there seem to be two stock components; one is along the continental shelf break but the other below 500 m depth in the open ocean, living apparently a pure pelagic lifestyle.

 

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Pollachius virens

ufsi

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The saithe is a large codfish, usually between 70 and 110 cm long in catches, but the largest individual caught in Icelandic waters measured 132 cm. It is found all around Iceland, but is rarer in the colder waters to the north and east of the country. The saithe can be described as benthopelagic fish, i.e., it occurs both close to the bottom and in the water column.

It has a streamlined shape and is consequently a very good swimmer. It can swim rapidly all over the Icelandic continental shelf and individuals tagged in Icelandic waters have several times been fished along mainland Europe. Fishes tagged in Europe have also been fished in Icelandic waters. The saithe is native to European waters from Murmansk in the north to the English Channel in the south. It is also found around the Faroe Islands, in Greenlandic waters and from Labrador to Cape Cod in North America.

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Melanogrammus aeglefinus

ysa

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The haddock is a rather large codfish, usual size in catches is between 50 and 65 cm long, but the largest individual caught in Icelandic waters measured 112 cm. It is found in abundance all around Iceland. During cold periods it is rather rare in the colder waters off the north coast, but in warmer periods it can be more common in the north than in the south.

Mostly it occurs over soft bottoms at depths between 10 and 200 m. It is found in European waters from Spitsbergen and the White Sea in the north to the Bay of Biscay in the south. It also occurs around the Faroe Islands, in southern Greenlandic waters and from Labrador to Cape Cod in North America.

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Reinhardtius hippoglossoides
graluda

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The Greenland halibut is currently the most valuable flatfish species in Icelandic waters, but it is a deep-water species, mainly found in the cold waters to the west, north and east of Iceland, a very different distribution from the other flatfish species. The Greenland halibut can be found in cold waters all around the Arctic, both on the Atlantic as well as on the Pacific side. Greenland halibut in East Greenlandic, Icelandic and Faroese waters are considered to be the same stock.

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Gadus morhua

torskur

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Cod is “the fish” in Iceland. It is by far the most important marine resource in Icelandic waters. Its economic importance has only briefly been surpassed by herring in the 20th century and possibly Greenland shark in the 19th. The cod is also a large, fecund, greedy and rather fast growing fish and therefore has great impact on other marine species in Icelandic waters.

The history of fisheries around Iceland has more or less rotated around the cod. Measures to manage the fisheries by extending the EEZ, closing areas to fishing and controlling the fleet size and the amount fished, have all been primarily aimed at the cod but only later also been applied to other species. The evolution of the fish processing industry has also primarily been because of the cod. The cod fisheries have, therefore, shaped Icelandic society for centuries. The only species that approaches the cod in historical importance has been the herring, but then only during the late 19th and early to mid 20th century.

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 Clupea harengus

sild

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close relative, the Pacific herring (Clupea pallasi) is also found in the northern Pacific Ocean. It is a pelagic zooplankton feeder, mostly feeding on the copepods Calanus finmarchicus. It is commonly between 30 and 40 cm length; the largest herring measured in Icelandic waters was 46.5 cm. It is a multispawner as opposed to the capelin and generally spawns in shallow waters in spring or summer. It can reach up to 25 years of age.

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Scomber scrombus

makrill

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The mackerel is a streamlined and fast swimming fish known from extensive migrations. It grows rapidly and is usually around 15 cm in the first autumn after spawning (in spring). It reaches sexual maturity at the age of 2 to 3, then around 30 cm long. Common size for adults is from 35 cm to 45 cm, but it can reach 60 cm in length. The mackerel feeds on a variety of pelagic animals, mostly crustaceans and fish juveniles.

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